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Maize, Millet, Sorghum Research Program

NATIONAL COORDINATED MAIZE, SORGHUM, MILLET & FODDER PROGRAMME
NARC, Islamabad

MAIZE, SORGHUM AND MILLET 

INTRODUCTION

Crop importance

Maize being the highest yielding cereal crop in the world is of significant importance for countries like Pakistan, where rapidly increasing population, feed and fodder demand have already out stripped the available food, feed and fodder supplies. Maize in Pakistan is cultivated as multipurpose food and forage crop, generally by resource poor farmers using marginal land. Maize is currently the leading world cereal both in terms of production and productivity. In Pakistan, it is the third most important cereal after wheat and rice. Maize is an important crop in Pakistan in terms of its food for human, feed for poultry and fodder for livestock utilization and as a raw material for the industry. Maize fodder can safely be fed at all stages of plant growth without danger of prussic acid, oxalic acid or ergot poisoning. Maize is the most suitable for silage and is called the king of crops for silage. It is planted on an area of 0.974 million hectare for grain purpose giving an annual production of 3.707 million tones of grains with average yield of 3805 kg/ha. The bulk (97%) of the total grain production comes from two major provinces, Punjab and KPK. Very little 2-3% maize grains are produced in the province of Sindh and Balochistan. Maize is also an important crop of AJK with about 0.122 million hectare of maize being planted during autumn. The adoption/cultivation of spring maize in Punjab has specially increased since the active involvement of multinationals in Pakistan. In Punjab during spring, progressive farmers are getting around 100 mds per acre and earning millions. These farmers are planting maize hybrids for grains with improved package of production technology. Spring maize cultivation is now started in KPK also. About 30-35% of the maize area is covered by the hybrids almost exclusively supplied by the multinational seed companies. About 4% for silage purpose which is increasing every year. These companies mainly rely on the imported seed and very small amount of locally produced hybrid seed is available in the market. This is one of the main reasons for the very high prices of the hybrid seed. However, hybrid maize production offers the most effective strategy for improving the yields of maize in Pakistan. Maize grains are not surplus in Pakistan. The demand of poultry only is more than maize grain production in Pakistan. Out of current production, about 60% is being utilized in poultry feed, 28% in wet milling like Rafhan and 6% in food. Food utilization is reducing but poultry feed and silage demand is increasing.

Sorghum and Millet are important crops grown under the environmental conditions which are too harsh for growing other cereal to produce grains. These regions are characterized by erratic distribution of annual rainfall, high mean temperature and depleted soil fertility. These are currently the fourth and fifth cereals, respectively in Pakistan. They are an important source of food, feed and fodder especially in the hot and dry areas of the country. These are grown on about 0.221 and 0.548 million hectares with production of 0.139 and 0.201 millions tones and average yield of 629and 631kg/ha, respectively. The yields are very low. Limited use of improved cultivator, inadequate plant population, lack/low level of fertilizer application, weed control measures, and water conservation practices mainly contribute to low yield levels. 

Experimental evidences and demonstrations on farmer’s field have revealed that through adoption of improved production technology enveloped in recent years, the grain yield can be enhanced substantially much beyond subsistence level in all pearl millet growing regions. These yields can be improved to a great extent provided the seed of improved varieties and hybrids is available and the traditional cultural practices are replaced by the improved production technologies. The improved varieties have been developed by the public sector institutes and the hybrids of both crops have been recently introduced by the private multinationals. Sorghum and Millet offer a real potential for improving the productivity in the hot and dry areas of the country where no other cereals can be grown. It needs early maturing and drought tolerant germplasm due to limited moisture and typical climatic conditions. A large area in Sind and Balochistan is very dry where sorghum and millet can successfully be grown. 

OBJECTIVES

  1. Acquisition and distribution of germplasm

  2. Plan and conduct annual Planning meeting and traveling seminars for scientists of maize, sorghum and millet crops

  3. Derivation/Maintenance of inbred lines for hybrid production

  4. Development of early/medium maturity maize varieties and hybrids for specific climatic conditions

  5. Evaluation/testing of national and international maize materials

  6. Development of germplasm sources tolerant to drought, cold, insect pests and other stress environments

  7. Development of low cost effective production technology for farmers

Position of Maize in World Cereals 2010-11

Cereals

Area         (Million ha)

Production 
(Million tons)

Yield (kg/ha)

Total Cereals

688

2458

3571

Maize

162

840

5195

Wheat

217

654

3009

Rice

159

696

4368

Sorghum

41

56

1361

Millet

35

32

908

Barley

48

124

2596

FAOSTAT 2012

  Position of Maize in Pakistan Cereals 2010-11

Cereals

Area

(000, ha)

Production

(OOO, tons)

Yield

(kg/ha)

Total Cereals

1333

3481

2611

Maize

974

3707

3806

Wheat

9132

23310

2553

Rice

2365

7235

3059

Sorghum

229

141

616

Millet

548

346

631

Barley

84

71

849

FAOSTAT 2012

 Trend of Maize Area, Production and Yield in Pakistan

Years

Area

M. Ha

Production

M.Tons

Yield

(kg/ha)

1947-1948

0.364

0.353

970

1980-1981

0.701

0.875

1248

1990-1991

0.863

1.179

1366

2000-2001

0.962

1.652

1717

2006-2007

1.020

3.090

3036

2007-2008

1.052

3.605

3427

2008-2009

1.118

4.036

3610

2009-2010

0.950

3.487

3671

2010-2011

0.974

3.707

3806

FAOSTAT 2012

Trend of Maize Area, Production and Yield in World

Years

Area

M. Ha

Production

M. Tons

Yield

(kg/ha)

2000-2001

137

592

4325

2006-2007

147

707

4810

2007-2008

159

788

4969

2008-2009

161

823

5109

2009-2010

159

819

5158

2010-2011

162

840

5195

FAOSTAT 2012

Province wise Area, Production and Yield in Pakistan 2010-11

Variables

Punjab

Khyber Pakhtunkhwa

Sindh

Balochistan

Pakistan

Area (000 Ha)

543.6

422.9

2.5

5.2

974.2

Production (000 ton)

2959.2

740.5

1.6

5.7

3707.0

Yield (kg/ha)

5444

1751

640

1096

3805

Percent of total area

56

43

0.3

0.5

 

Percent of total production

80

20

0.04

0.15

 

 Utilization of Maize Area (%) Planted for Grains in Pakistan

Grains

95

Silage

4

Green Cobs

1

Utilization of Maize Grains (%) in Pakistan

Industry (wet milling)

Home consumption products

Industrial used products

30

Feed

60

Food

6

Seed and others

4

Targets for Planting Maize for the Year 2010-11 and Achievements

Years

Area

(mil. ha)

Production (mil. tons)

Yield

(kg/ha)

2009-2010

0.950

3.487

3671

Target

1.065

3.536

 

2010-2011

0.974

3.707

3806

Area could not be planted according to targets but production achieved was more than targets because of increase in yield/ha.

i.  Varieties Situation

Overall, about 35 maize, 9 sorghum and 7 millet varieties are developed by different public institutes under NARS. The following varieties are currently under cultivation.

ZONE

VARIETIES

Sowing Time

Mid Altitudes of KPK

Pahari,  Azam, Kissan

May-June

Any suitable commercial hybrid

May-June

Irrigated Areas of KPK

Sarhad white, Sarhad yellow, Kissan, Iqbal

June-July

Hybrids like Karamat,Babar or any suitable commercial hybrid

July

Irrigated areas of Punjab

Golden, Sahiwal-2002, MMRI Yellow

February-March

July-August

Hybrids like FSH-810, Yousafwala hybrid or any suitable commercial hybrid

February-March

July-August

Rainfed Areas

Agaiti-2002,  Kisan, Azam

July

Sindh

Golden, Sarhad yellow, Sahiwal-2002, MMRI Yellow,

July, August

Any suitable commercial hybrid

July, August

Balochistan

Pahari, Kissan, Azam

June-July

Gilgit-Baltistan

Sarhad Yellow, Pahari, Kissan, Azam

May-June

AJK

Sarhad White, Pahari, Kashmir Gold, Kissan, Azam

May-June

Impact of Varieties/Hybrids and Technologies

YEARS

AREA

HA

Increase

PRODUCTION

TON./HA

YIELD

(KG/HA)

1947-48

364

 

353

 

970

 

1970

648

78

657

86

1007

4

Increase in yield is due to diversification of US maize material and double cross hybrids by MMRI, Yousafwala and CCRI, Pirsabak.

1970

648

 

657

 

1007

 

1980

701

14

875

19

1248

29

This increase in yield is mainly due to Coordination, germplasm provided to provinces and development of synthetics varieties by MMRI and CCRI started.

1980

701

 

875

 

1248

 

1990

863

23

1179

35

1366

9

In coordination, Annual planning meetings and Traveling seminars were conducted which streamline the breeding program in provinces and NARC. Development and Spread of Synthetic varieties release by NARC, KPK and Punjab were increased. Yield increased further.

1990-1991

863

 

1179

 

1366

 

2000-2001

962

11

1652

40

1717

26

In traveling seminars, close discussion of scientists with farmers and extension people gave feed back and farmers were given guidelines about adoption of varieties and production technologies. This increase in yield was because of adoption of synthetic varieties with optimal production technology.

2000-2001

962

 

1652

 

1717

 

2004-2005

982

2

2797

69

2800

63

Hybrid cultivation in Punjab especially during spring season increased the yield vertically.

2004-2005

982

 

2797

 

2800

 

2007-2008

1118

14

4036

44

3611

29

In traveling seminars, detail discussion of scientists with farmers, NGOs and extension people gave feed back and farmers were given guidelines about adoption of hybrids/ varieties and production technologies. Because of increase in area under hybrids in Punjab and start of hybrid cultivation in KPK, yield increased.

2007-2008

1118

 

4036

 

3611

 

2009-2010

935

-16

3262

-19

3488

-3

Area under hybrid during spring in Punjab decreased by 16% which is mainly due to high price of wheat, Bt cotton, reduction in poultry production due to high prices of breeding chickens, reduction in textile and other industries due to power shortage. Area reduction is higher but yield reduction is minimal due to increase area under hybrid in KPK.

In short, adoption of hybrids/improved varieties along with improved production technology resulted in increased yields vertically. Coordination played important role in all process.

ii. Problems/Issues/Constraints and their solutions

a. High cost of inputs

Input like fertilizers, herbicides and insecticides costs are increasing every year and beyond the reach of resource poor farmers.

By lower or subsidize prices of inputs, farmers will use them and will get high production.

b. High prices of commercial hybrids

The hybrids under cultivation are mainly belong to multinational seed companies which are imported and are very costly (Rs. 450-550 per kg) and apart the range of resource poor farmers and this why area under hybrids is lower.

Multinational seed companies should start seed production locally, the prices may be lower. Local seed companies who have their local production should be encouraged, their hybrid prices are lower. The public sector should enhance their hybrid development and production, so that farmers could get hybrids on lower prices.

c. Low adoption of improved production technologies for growing maize

One of the major reasons for low yield is the low adoption of improved technologies. The costs of inputs used in improved technologies are increasing day by day. Because of very high prices of DAP, progressive farmers also minimize this fertilizer. Farmers in rainfed area are afraid of failure of the crop due to lower rainfall.

By lower or subsidize prices of inputs, farmers will adopt improved production technologies and will get high production.

d. Availability of quality seed

Majority of the farmers have demand for high yielding improved seed but due to non availability of pure quality seed, they plant their own local or mixture seed and got poor production. There is no proper system for seed production.

There should be proper infra structure for seed production where farmers can get quality seed. There is need to establish cooperatives among the farmers which will manage the seed production among the farmers and disseminate them farmers to farmers.

e. Heat burning in hot areas

In Punjab and Sindh during hot season temperature raise beyond 45oC which cause tassel blast in maize and lost of viability of pollen and silk. There is no suitable variety or hybrid which resists high temperature. The only solution is to change planting dates to escape very high temperature during reproductive stage of the crop.

Heat resistant varieties or hybrids should be developed which can only be possible when these are developed under high temperature in those areas.

f. Lower on-farm activities and demonstration

On-farm research and demonstration have been reduced due budget constraints. These activities are very important in selection of varieties in developing new varieties or hybrids, their demonstration and dissemination, and also dissemination of production technologies.

g. Instability in prices

Prices grains fluctuate largely which cause in reduction in planting area. The support price of wheat when increased with high pace, farmers leave to grow maize in spring and prefer to plant wheat. During spring, mainly hybrids are grown and when spring area reduces, overall maize production lowers.

The prices of grains should be stable. The middle men (Arhti) become united and force the farmers to sell produce on lower prices which is very troublesome for the farmers. Their management is needed. The support price of competitive crop should not be raised abruptly.

h. Socio-economic conditions of the farmers

In central Punjab (Corn Belt), farmers have medium to big landholdings and sound economically. Small farmers in Punjab are not well sound economically. In KPK, very small numbers of farmers have medium landholdings and majority of the farmers are resource poor with small landholdings and can’t afford high costs.

If suitable measurement against above problems taken, the socio-economic conditions of the farmers will be improved.

 

CURRENT RESEARCH

i. Coordinated Activities like germplasm acquisition and distribution, NUYTs

Germplasm acquisition and distribution to provinces is a regular activity of Maize, Sorghum and Millet, NARC. During last year (2012), about 200 germplasm of maize and 30 germplasm of sorghum of different types were acquired and distributed to MMRI, Yousafwala (Sahiwal), CCRI, Pirsabaq (Nowshara), ARI, D.I. Khan, ARS, Mansehra and NARC itself. Overall, the germplasm acquired since start are about 22,000 of maize, 4,000 of sorghum and 2,000 of millet. Out of these, about 15,000 of maize, 2,000 of sorghum and 1,400 of millet were distributed to different institutes in provinces. Remainings were evaluated at NARC.

The increase in yield during different years is mainly due to Coordination, germplasm provided to provinces and development of synthetics varieties by MMRI and CCRI started.

In coordination, Annual planning meetings and Traveling seminars were conducted which streamline the breeding program in provinces and NARC. Development and Spread of Synthetic varieties release by NARC, KPK and Punjab were increased. Yield increased further.

In traveling seminars, close discussion of scientists with farmers and extension people gave feed back and farmers were given guidelines about adoption of varieties and production technologies. This increase in yield was because of adoption of synthetic varieties with optimal production technology.

ii. Variety Development work

Maize varieties development is a main activity of NARC, Islamabad; MMRI, Yousafwala; CCRI, Pirsabak; ARS and Bafa (Mansehra). The varieties of sorghum and millet are being developed at NARC, Islamabad; MMRI, Yousafwala; ARI, D.I. Khan; RARI, Bahawalpur, BARI, Chakwal and in Sindh.

Maize hybrids are being developed at MMRI, CCRI and NARC. Sorghum hybrids are being developed by MMRI and NARC.

iii. Production Technology Development/Refinement

Different cost effective production technologies are developed at all above mentioned institutes and disseminated by them.

The following technologies are developed at NARC.

  • Package of production technologies for rainfed and highland areas.

  • Phases (steps) to adopt fully improved maize production technology.

  • Role of improved seed on sustained basis with 20% more yield.

  • Technology for Grain cum fodder needs.

  • Deep tillage technology for moisture conservation.

  • Economical and effective chemical control of perennial weeds like Sorghum helipense in rainfed areas.

  • Environment friendly maize stem borer resistant technology through Host Plant Resistance.

  • Technology for artificial infestation of maize stem borer on maize crop and sorghum crops.

  • Minimized biohazard of pesticide formulation for the control of stem borer and shoot fly.

  • Optimized scheduling of granules application for the control of maize stem borer and shoot fly.

  • Portable electrical/manual maize sheller for hilly areas designed in collaboration with Farm Machinery Institute which reduces time and losses due to manual shelling.

  • Designed a Spraying Boom for Knap Sack spraying pump with two -fold efficiency.

 

ACHIEVEMENTS

i. Production Technology Developed

  • Package of production technologies for rainfed and highland areas.

  • Phases (steps) to adopt fully improved maize production technology.

  • Role of improved seed on sustained basis with at least 20% more yield.

  • Technology for Grain cum fodder needs.

  • Deep tillage technology for moisture conservation.

  • Economical and effective chemical control of perennial weeds like baru (Sorghum helipense) in rainfed areas.

  • Environment friendly maize technology against stem borer resistant through Host Plant Resistance.

  • Technology for artificial infestation of maize stem borer on maize crop and sorghum crops.

  • Minimized biohazard of pesticide formulation for the control of stem borer and shoot fly.

  • Optimized scheduling of granules application for the control of maize stem borer and shoot fly.

  • Portable electrical/manual maize sheller for hilly areas designed in collaboration with Farm Machinery Institute which reduces time and losses due to manual shelling.

  • Designed a Spraying Boom for Knap Sack spraying pump with two -fold efficiency.

ii. Varieties Developed under NARS
 

MAIZE VARIETIES DEVELOP BY DIFFERENT INSTITUTES UNDER NARS

Khyber

CCRI, Pirsabak

1974

Full Season, semi dent, white, 115 days

Zia

CCRI, Pirsabak

1974

Short season, dent, white, 95 days

Sadaf

MMRI, Yousafwala

1975

Full season, semident, white, 115 days

Changaz

CCRI, Pirsabak

1976

Short season, dent, white, 100 days

Shaheen

CCRI, Pirsabak

1977

Short season, flint, white, 80 days

Sarhad white

CCRI, Pirsabak

1978

Full season, semi dent, white, 115 days maturity

Sarhad Yellow

CCRI, Pirsabak

1979

Full season, semi dent, yellow, 115 days maturity

Dehqan

CCRI, Pirsabak

1981

Full season, semi dent, white, 115 days maturity

Faisal

MMRI, Yousafwala

1981

Short season, semi dent, yellow, 100 days maturity

Golden Pearl

MMRI, Yousafwala

1981

Full season, semi dent, yellow, 120 days maturity

Afrat

MMRI, Yousafwala

1982

Short season, flint, yellow, 100 days maturity

Munawar

CCRI, Pirsabak

1983

Full season, semi dent, white, 110 days maturity

Sunehri

MMRI, Yousafwala

1985

Short season, semi dent, yellow, 100 days

New Shaheen

CCSI, Pirsabak

1985

Short season, flint, white, 75 days maturity

Kashmir Gold

NARC, Islamabad

1983

Short season, semi dent, yellow, 105 days

Gauher

NARC, Islamabad

1985

Short season, flint, white, 95 days maturity

Azam

CCRI, Pirsabak

1986

Short season, semi dent, white, 95 days maturity

Ehsan

CCRI, Pirsabak

1986

Short season, white, 100 days maturity

Sultan

MMRI, Yousafwala

1986

Full season, Semi dent, yellow, 115 days maturity

Kissan

CCRI, Pirsabak

1990

Short season, semi dent, white, 95 days maturity

Agaiti-85

MMRI, Yousafwala

1995

Short season, semi dent, yellow, 90 days maturity

Golden

MMRI, Yousafwala

1995

Full season, semi dent, yellow, 115 days

Pahari

CCRI, Pirsabak

1995

Short season, semi dent, white 85 days maturity

Agaiti-2002

MMRI, Yousafwla

2002

Short season, semi dent, yellow, 90 days maturity

Sahiwal-2002

MMRI, Yousafwala

2002

Full season, semi dent, yellow, 120 days maturity

Chandni

MMRI, Yousafwala

2004

Full season, semi flint, white, 110 days maturity

Jalal

CCRI, Pirsabak

2004

Short season, flint, white, 95 days maturity

Iqbal

CCRI, Pirsabak

2008

Full season, semi dent, white, 115 days

MMRI Yellow

MMRI, Yousafwala

2011

Full season, semi dent, yellow, 120 days

Pearl

MMRI, Yousafwala

2011

Full season, semi dent, white, 115 days

 

SORGHUM VARIETIES DEVELOPED BY DIFFERENT INSTITUTES UNDER NARS

DS-75

ARI, D.I.Khan

1975

Short season,

Pak SS-2

MMRI, Yousafwala

1976

Fulseason, dual purpose, stay green

Ghiza-3

ARI, D.I.Khan

1981

Short season, dual purpose drought tolerant variety

DS-97

ARI, D.I.Khan

1997

Short season, stay green, dual purpose drought tolerant variety

YSS-98

MMRI, Yousafwala

1999

Full season, stay green, dual purpose drought tolerant variety

DS-2003

ARI, D.I.Khan

2003

Short season, dual purpose drought tolerant variety

Johar

NARC, Islamabad

2006

Short season, stay green dual purpose drought tolerant variety. 

 

  ii.            MILLET VARIETIES DEVELOPED BY DIFFERENT INSTITUTES UNDER NARS

BY-18

MMRI, Yousafwala

1976

Full season

DB-2

ARI, D.I.Khan

1976

Short season

DB-5

ARI, D.I.Khan

1982

Short season

DB-2003

ARI, D.I.Khan

2003

Short season, stay green, dual purpose variety

Composit-2003

ARI, D.I.Khan

2003

Short season, stay green, dual purpose variety

Bajra Super-1

NARC, Islamabad

2006

Short season, stay green dual purpose drought tolerant variety. 

  iii.            MAIZE HYBRIDS DEVELOPED BY DIFFERENT INSTITUTES UNDER NARS

YH-201

MMRI, Yousafwala

1987

Full season, Semi dent, yellow, 120 days maturity

YH-301

MMRI, Yousafwala

1988

Full season, Semi dent, yellow, 120 days maturity

YH-401

MMRI, Yousafwala

1989

Full season, Semi dent, yellow, 115 days maturity

Ghouri

CCRI, Pirsabak

1997

Full season, semi flint, yellow, 120 days maturity

Babar

CCRI, Pirsabak

1997

Full season, Semi dent, white, 150 days

Kiramat (Hybrid)

CCRI, Pirsabak

2008

Full season, semi dent, white, 115 days

Yousafwala Hybrid

MMRI, Yousafwala

2011

Full season, semi dent, yellow, 120 days

FH-810

MMRI, Yousafwala

2011

Full season, semi dent, yellow, 115 days

Narc-2704

NARC, Islamabad

2011

Medium maturity, semi dent, white, 105 days

iv.            Germplasm acquiredfrom International centres/distributed to Institutes in Provices

Crop

Accession acquired

Accession evaluated at NARC

Accession distributed to provincial units

Maize

22,000

7,000

15,000

Sorghum

4,000

1,500

2,500

Millet

2,000

600

1400

Total

28,000

9,100

18,900

 v.            HR Development, internees, Ph.D, M.Sc. Research, Farmer training

M.Sc.

B.Sc. Internship

Farmers

Thesis Evauated

Synopsis Evaluated

Extension workers

20

40

Unlimited

10

300

50

 

 

 

 

 

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

a. Objectives

  • Self sufficiency in hybrid seed production technology through production of indigenous maize hybrids on larger scale.

  • In the long run, maize production in different areas of Pakistan will be modernized boosting the economic condition of the farmers as well as the country.

b. Current Activities

  • Hybrid seed production

  • Purification of parental lines

  • Seed increase of parental lines for hybrid seed production

  • Evaluation of hybrid under differ fertility

c. Expected Output

  • Purification of inbred lines.

  • Increase of Parental lines for seed production.

  • Evaluation of line x tester combinations.

d. Cost

Rs. 11.704 million

e. Duration 5 years

f. Name of PI/Co-PI Mr. Mozammil Hussain, PSO

g. Dr. Habib Iqbal Javed, PSO/Coordinator Co.PI

SUMMARY OF ACHIEVEMENTS OF CRPs

Total germplasm acquired, screened and distributed

  Acquired  28,000
  Distributed 18,900
  Screened 9,100
Varieties/Hybrid Developed  
  Varieties released 32
  Varieties pipeline 19
  Hybrid released  5
  Hybrid pipeline 7
  Technologies generated 12
NUYT Coordination   
  Number of Location where NUYT conducted 25  
  Hybrids Tested                                                                                               700
  Varieties Tested 100
  Annual Meeting  11
  Traveling Seminar conducted 9
  Farmers Visited/Guided  >1000
  Government farm visited  17
  Human Resource Development  
  Long term training 20
  Short Term trainings   150
  Manpower provided  40
Equipments, machinery/vehicles   
  Equipments and Machinery  66
  Vehicles 11
  Tractor 2
  Motor Cycles 5
  Cycles  8

 

STATUS PAPER

PUBLICATIONS 

 

SCIENTIFIC STAFF 

S.No.

Name

Designation/Specialization

 E-mail

01 Dr. Muhammad Shafiq Zahid PSO/ PL This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
02 Mrs. Irshad Begum PSO This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

03

Dr. Muhammad Ashraf PSO This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

04

Mr. Mozammil Hussain PSO This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

05

Dr. Javed Fateh PSO This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

06

Mr. Ashiq Saleem SSO This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
07 Dr. Rashid Saleem SSO This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
08 Mr.Tauseef Taj Kiani SO This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Resource Person:

Dr. Muhammad Shafiq Zahid

PSO/ PL

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 


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